Saturday, October 16, 2010

DUNN Home in Nauvoo Restored

See newly added historical information above and below home photos.
Deed for the sale of the Dunn Property on Hyde and Parley Street old Nauvoo, Illinois

The Prophet Joseph Smith sold Simeon Adams DUNN the property where Simeon built the first two story home in Nauvoo in about 1841, Joseph Smith congratulated him on the home. Simeon lost two wives while living in this Nauvoo home. First Adaline RAWSON who he had married 11 Jul 1828, died in 1841 she was mother of seven children, three daughters lived to marry. Second 19 June 1842 Simeon married Margaret SNYDER mother of two, one daughter lived to marry. She died Before May of 1846. Margaret was sealed in life to Simeon the same day he was seal to Adaline 22 Jan 1846 NAUVO - Nauvoo (original).

From memories of Adaline's daughter Mary DUNN's:
"After joining the Church, they moved to Nauvoo, where Simeon A. Dunn purchased land upon which to build his home, from the Prophet Joseph Smith. The house he built was in a good state of preservation in August 1941, when his grandson, Adams Wesley Ensign and his wife visited that city. The house, which was then occupied by an elderly couple, showed them the deed of conveyance to Simeon A. Dunn, signed by Joseph and Emma Smith and also a deed of conveyance from Simeon A. Dunn to them. The house has since been restored with donations from the Dunn descendants and is owned by Nauvoo Restoration, Inc. The home is now used as a residence for couple missionaries and upon request a personal tour can be arranged by contacting the current resident missionaries. A great-grandson, Leslie Smith Dunn, Jr. and his wife, Marion of Brigham City, Utah, placed a registration book in the home to be signed (name and address) only by descendent's of Simeon Adams Dunn."

"We settled on what was called Hyde and Parley St., not far from the home of the Prophet that then was called The Mission House."

"On one occasion my father, Simeon A. Dunn was sick and the Prophet came to our house to administer to him. He commenced to joke to him about our house. He said, “I didn’t know as I would have had faith to administer to you if you hadn’t built your house two stories high. It can be seen from all over town.” Ours was the first two-story house in Nauvoo."
(Mary Dunn Ensign Mormon: Autobiography)


early
[?window above the door in this photo?]

1962
Courtesy of the Church Archives, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
1965
Courtesy of the Church Archives, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
1967
Courtesy of the Church Archives, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
1970
Courtesy of the Church Archives, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
1976
Courtesy of the Church Archives, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
Thanks to Paula Paradise for sharing many of these photo.
2002
pictured are four 4th great grand daughters of Simeon Adams DUNN and Adaline RAWSON

On 18 October 1844, Shadrach Roundy, Simeon Dunn, and Joshua Smith were in Aaron Johnson's court in Nauvoo. Aaron Johnson, a Mormon, was also a Justice of the peace for Hancock County. That day each of them registered their deeds with the County as the owner of their properties. The next day justice of the Peace Johnson found the men guilty of three judgment counts against them collectively for $90, $80, and $79.90. After discussing the best way to pay off the debts, the three men decided to work together. The three men quickly put each other's names on their deeds [without registering them with the county] and then mingled the properties into one mortgage deed. They received $300 to pay off their judgments from John A. Forgeus, who had been excommunicated from the church for standing up for Sidney Rigdon. Whether they asked Mr. Forgeus for the money, or whether he bought the judgments from the court is not known. They had until 18 April 1845, to repay the loan or lose their lands.
(Shadrach and Betsey Roundy Their Roots and Their Legacy, By Renee Rich Mounteer, p.149)


Around the 7th or 8th of February 1845, Hosea Stout made a number of observations in his diary regarding the old police, one on those observations being that the old police had "spent the entire winter thus far without any remuneration and kept up the guard to the satisfaction of the Twelve and other authorities and now they in return were willing to put some business into our hands to afford us a small compensation for our support. It also was an encouragement to us to persevere in the discharge of our duty as policemen." Hosea usually met with the police every evening to review the day and make the next day's assignments.

So the reason
Shadrach and Simeon Dunn had been unable to pay their bills may have been the siple fact that they had not been paid anything for their full-time service protectiong the city of Nauvoo, the temple, and leaders of the church; possibly since the death of the Prophet Joseph....
(Shadrach and Betsey Roundy Their Roots and Their Legacy, By Renee Rich Mounteer, p.151)

The mortgage payment for Shadrach & Betsey's home, Simeon Dunn's home, and Joshua Smith's property was due on the 18th of April. In those days if mortgages were not paid on the exact due date, there was not usually a problem. On 3 May 1845, Shadrach and Betsey sold the southeast quarter of their lot to John P. Barnard for $300. This was for the exact amount the three men owed John Forgeus. So he did not get their properties. John P. Barnard was an acquaintance of Shadrach's from Missouri where they had both been witnesses in the Lyon's appeal Case. John had done well for himself financially. Perhaps he bought this quarter of Shadrach's property not as a friend to help save all three men from losing their lands, but as an investment Simeon Dunn and Shadrach were both working full time for the church's protection. They definitely were not getting wealthy.
(Shadrach and Betsey Roundy Their Roots and Their Legacy, By Renee Rich Mounteer, p.153)


On 4 November 1845...

That day Joshua Smith died as a result of poisoning by the militia at Carthage. He had been one of the city council members who had to return to Carthage on writ of "inciting a riot" with the Expositor affair. He had been searched by the militia when he went into Carthage. They found a small knife under his arm pit. They threw him in jail and fed him a meal. Immediately after wards, he started to vomit. after returning to Nauvoo, he continued to grow worse until he died. Because he accused the militia of poisoning him with the food, an autopsy was performed by three doctors; and his accusations were confirmed. he had been the third individual on the mortgage deed with
Simeon Dunn and Shadrach Roundy.
(Shadrach and Betsey Roundy Their Roots and Their Legacy, By Renee Rich Mounteer, p.160)

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