Thursday, February 10, 2011

BOSWORTH and BUCKLAND Families sailed 1634 on Elizabeth Dorcas

Ancient Map of Massachusetts Bay
No passenger list has been found for 1634 Elizabeth Dorcas. But from excerpts we know that Edward Bosworth and his family were aboard.

From the Diary of Samuel Sewall (Vol. 3, page 396):

Edward Bosworth, the Father, being ready to dye ask’d to be carried upon Deck, that he might see Canaan. When he had seen the Land he resigned his Soul and dyed: was carried ashoar and buried at Boston.


Bosworth Family
:
Bosworth, Edward

Bosworth, Mary
[wife of Edward BOSWORTH]
Bosworth, Mary
[daughter of Edward and Mary, wife of William BUCKLAND and their son Joseph]
Bosworth, Benajmin

Bosworth, Nathaniel


Son Jonathan came earlier - [Cambridge, MA, records as early as 1633]


Edward BOSWORTH
b. about 1586 in England; m. 1611 Mary _____; d. abt. 5 August 1634 at Boston Harbor, MA


Their Children:

1. Mary b. abt. 1611; m. William BUCKLAND; abt 29 July 1687
2. Jonathan b. 1613 in England; m. Elizabeth ______; d. 3 January 1688 at Rehoboth, Bristol, MA, aged 75 years

3. Benjamin b. 1615; m (1) unknown; m (2) Beatrice Nee Unknown Josselyn

4. Nathaniel b. 4 September 1617; m. Bridget Bellamy

Edward and his family, Mary and three children including the son-in-law, sailed on the Elizabeth Dorcas in the spring of 1634. Jonathan had already immigrated a few years prior and was living in Cambridge, Middlesex, MA. Edward never made it onto land. The Elizabeth Dorcas lost sixty passengers before docking. Many of the bodies having been buried at sea. Edward died as the ship was sailing into Boston Harbor.


From the Diary of Samuel Sewall (Vol. 3, page 396): Edward Bosworth, the Father, being ready to dye ask’d to be carried upon Deck, that he might see Canaan. When he had seen the Land he resigned his Soul and dyed: was carried ashoar and buried at Boston. “On 5 August 1634, it was “ordered that such monies shall be laid out for r the maintenance of Widow Bosworth & her family, shall be paid again by the Treasurer {MBCR 1:23}. On 7 July 1634, in “consideration of money disbursed by Mr. Henry Seawell for the transportation of Edward Bosworth & his family, it is ordered that Jonathan Bosworth shall pay to Mr. Seawall the sum of £5 upon the 29th of September next; Will[ia]m Buckland £5 on the said 29th of September; Nathanaell Bosworth 50s. at the said day, & 50s. more that day twelve month’ & Benjamyn Bosworth 30s. on the said 29th of September, and £3 10s. at midsummer next; all these sums to be paid to the said Mr. Seawall” [MBCR 1:152].
------------------------------------
Buckland Family:
Buckland William
Buckand, Mary
[wife of William, daughter of Edward and Mary BOSWORTH]
Buckand Joseph


(http://jskent.blogspot.com/2009/12/william-buckland-family-us-1635-to.html)
William BUCKLAND b. abt. 1606 in England; m. bef. 1634
Mary BOSWORTH
; [
b. abt. 1611;] d. 1683 at Weymouth, Norfolk, MA, aged 77 years

Their Children:

1. Joseph b. 26 June 1633 at England

2. Lydia b. 1637 [Swansea, Bristol, MA; m. 1) John BROWN abt 1654 Bristol, Bristol, MA, m. 2) Lieutenant William LORD 3 Jun 1664 in Rehoboth, Bristol, MA, m. 3) Thomas DUNK 1679 in Saybrook, Middlesex, CT, m. 4) Lieutenant Abraham POST Mar 1684 in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut.]

3. Benjamin b. bef. 2 July 1640 at Hingham, Plymouth, MA; m. 1660 Rachel Wheatley Allen at Hingham, Plymouth, MA; d. 26 March 1676 slain at a place called Nine Men's Misery, King Philip War.


Note from the website http://www.bucklinsociety.net/wm1_story_part1.htm: "The first author reporting on William Bucklin's emigration to New England was Charles Edward Banks, who in his books, The Winthrop Fleet of 1630, and Planters of the Commonwealth, records that William came in the Winthrop fleet of 1630. There is no regular passenger list of the passengers in the Winthrop fleet, but William's name does show up on Winthrop's journal notes, as a servant of John Plaistow, and that is what Banks uses for his report. Plaistow was officially "a gentleman" from Essex. Space was limited in the Winthrop fleet ships ,and only persons with the rank of noble or gentleman had space or temporary cabins on the upper deck. Winthrop's note that William was on board as a "servant" of Plaistow means that William had the privilege denied others of ready and daily access to the upper deck. Since our William Bucklin was a carpenter, he probably accompanied Plaistow as a builder rather than a menial servant. However, his relationship as a servant of Plaistow got William into trouble. In September, 1631, Plaistow took or stole four baskets of corn belonging to "Chickatabot," who was a Native American. (3) The Colony's Court ordered Plaistow degraded from the title of gentleman and shipped back to England, ordered Plaistow to give eight baskets of corn to Chickatabot, and ordered Plaistow to pay a fine of five English pounds to the Colony. Since William and Thomas Andrew were Plaistow's servants, subject to his orders, they merely were whipped for being accessories. The next ship back to England did not depart until after the spring brought more ships coming to New England. The records show Plaistow was sent back to England by June of 1632, and his land and possessions being sold to settle debts he had owed to others in the Colony.. So if William came to America In 1630 with Plaistow, he must have returned once to England."

William Buckland came over on the Elizabeth Dorcas in 1634 with his wife, Mary, their son, Joseph, and Mary's parents, the Bosworth's. The family first settled in Hingham, Plymouth, MA. He had land on the north side of Otis (Weary-All) hill. In 1635 the house lot was near the old railroad station located in West Hingham, Plymouth, MA. In 1666, he owned land at Broad Cove.


The Rehoboth Town Meeting Records of one of their first meetings (February 1, 1645), tell us, ". . . At the same time the way to William Buckland's house is agreed on by those partyes which it doth conform." So we know that probably at least by the fall of 1644, Bucklin had built a house on the land, and maintained his ownership of the land against the later arrivals/ William's house stood in the area of the 1641 property deal made with Native Americans by John Hazels About 1655 or so the family moved to Rehoboth, Bristol, MA. There William served as grand jury man, 19 May 1656, and constable, 25 May 1657. From the Rehoboth Propriety Records Book 2 p. 81, William drew lot #46. He was freeman on February 12, 1657. Other properties belonging to William Bucklin: 1. 600 acres bought of Edward Smith, bounded on Pawtucket River on West and unto a run that comes from the Cedar Swamp on the East. 2. 4 acres of fresh meadow near house, bounded with a river on the East.
3.. 4 acres of salt and fresh meadow bounded with the Pawtucket River on the west.
4. 33 acres of upland butting upon the Pawtucket on west, land of Thomas Cooper on East. 5. 1 1/2 acres Pawtucket River on West. 6. 2 1/2 acres same range with John Reade. 7. 6 acres of land that was John Millards and six acres that was Widow Walkers. 8. One Plaine lott- 22 acres on East side of greate plaine 9. One lott on East side of Plaine, 10 acres, River to East, highway to west.
10. One lott on East side of Plaine, 10 acres.
11. 16 acres "I had in the last division of land, 10 acres I exchanged with Jonathan Bliss. 12. 2 Plaine lotts which I had of Jonathan Bliss in exchange, 12 acres. 13. A piece of fresh meadow, 2 acres William sold land in Hingham on May 25, 1661. He had 12 acres of upland in Wachamoket Neck. On 22 October 1680, he received land laid for highway to the Salt water for cattle to go to drink. William Bucklin died in 1683. The only record of the death is in the Rehoboth Vital Record Death Book, Volume One, page 56, which only says "buried September 1, 1683."

However, his relationship as a servant of Plaistow got William into trouble. In September, 1631, Plaistow took or stole four baskets of corn belonging to "Chickatabot," who was a Native American. (3) The Colony's Court ordered Plaistow degraded from the title of gentleman and shipped back to England, ordered Plaistow to give eight baskets of corn to Chickatabot, and ordered Plaistow to pay a fine of five English pounds to the Colony. Since William and Thomas Andrew were Plaistow's servants, subject to his orders, they merely were whipped for being accessories. The next ship back to England did not depart until after the spring brought more ships coming to New England. The records show Plaistow was sent back to England by June of 1632, and his land and possessions being sold to settle debts he had owed to others in the Colony.. So if William came to America In 1630 with Plaistow, he must have returned once to England."

This family History was found at "The Neverending Hobby" (http://jskent.blogspot.com/)

Ancestry Chain: 13th gr. grandfather - Edward BOSWORTH 1634 Immigrant, 12th gr. grandparents - Mary BOSWORTH 1634 Immigrant with husband William BUCKLAND 1631 and 1634 Immigrant, Lydia BUCKLAND b.1628, Capt. John BROWN b.1650, John BROWN Capt. b.1675, Martha BROWN b.1729, John JEFFORDS b.1746, Lucretia JEFFORDS b.1766, Amariah RAWSON b.1787, Adaline RAWSON b.1811, Mary DUNN b.1833, Harriett Camilla ENSIGN b.1859,George Ensign SMITH b.1898, Camilla SMITH b.1926, Lark, JR.

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