Monday, September 28, 2009

1843 Mormon Trail - William INGRAM and Susannh GRIFFITHS - English Saints


Mormon Pioneer ancestor of Camilla SMITH WOOD
From JR back eight generations William INGRAM or INGRAHAM (1790-1844) and Susannah GRIFFITHS (1797-1865) m. 1834

In 1843 they traveled with four children from England to St. Louis both dieing before they reached Nauvoo. Children Richard, Sarah Jane, and Fanny went on to Nauvoo and then to Utah.

William INGRAM and his second wife Susanna GRIFFITHS were strong and good honest workers. They joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints when it was first preached in England. Frances (Fanny, correct English record name) Ann was blessed by Brother Parley P. Pratt when she was a baby.

William and Susanna INGRAM with their three children: Richard, Jane (Sarah Jane) and Fanny (Frances Ann), and two children of William Ingram's by his first marriage, one being Eliza Ingram age 9, (making five children in all) left England for America in 1842, when Frances Ann was but 2 years old. A number of other relatives made the trip at the same time.

Theirs was a perilous journey, because ocean storms raged until one time it was feared that the ship [Yorkshire] would capsize and all be destroyed. The sailors said not to worry they would be all right as there were a lot of Mormons on board the vessel. Their prayers for safety were answered and after [eight (8)] weeks of anxiety, they landed on American soil.

They came to St. Louis but were not there but a short time when the Black Measles broke out and they both (parents) died within a week, leaving three small children, 8 yrs old, Richard, Jane 4 yrs. And Fanny (Frances Ann) age 2 years. It is believed the older children went back to England.

Their Uncle Richard Griffiths and his wife Mary took the children and gave them a home, they moved several times. At one time they lived near a forest of trees and the children would get the nuts in the fall for winter. They live in and around Nauvoo before they moved with the Saints to Utah. Aunt Mary died on the way and Uncle Richard may have gone on the California leaving children on there own as in Utah. Richard age 11, Jane age 9 or 10, Francis Ann age 6 or 7. The girls were living in Utah with Sarah WOODING SMITH mother of Samuel SMITH.

(See: Histories of sisters Sarah Jane Ingram Smith - Compiled by Amy Ann Smith Hancock Empey ­ September 5, 1962 and Frances Ann Ingram Smith sent to Amy Ann Smith Hancock Empey by Esther Ann Smith Forsgren family ­ November 3, 1962.)
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Ingram, Eliza, 1843, NA, Yorkshire, Ship roster on microfilm(s) 200151
Ingram, Fanny, 1843, NA, Yorkshire, Ship roster on microfilm(s) 200151
Ingram, Jane, 1843, NA, Yorkshire, Ship roster on microfilm(s) 200151
Ingram, Richard, 1843, NA, Yorkshire, Ship roster on microfilm(s) 200151

Ingram, Susannah, 1843, NA, Yorkshire, Ship roster on microfilm(s) 200151
Ingram, William, 1843, NA, Yorkshire, Ship roster on microfilm(s) 200151

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Historical Vignette: Travel on the Bark Yorkshire in March, April & May 1843
Taken from the book Ships, Saints and Mariners, by Conway B. Sonne, published 1987 by University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City.

Yorkshire
Bark: 658 tons: 134' x 29' x 23'
Built: 1842 by MacIntosh at Richibucto, New Brunswick, Canada

On 8 March 1843 the British bark Yorkshire sailed from Liverpool under the command of Captain William Bache. Among her 122 passengers were 83 Mormons. Elders Thomas Bullock and Richard Rushton presided over the Saints. Other returning missionaries were John Needham, George Spilsbury, and John Gailey. For the first few days all of the passengers were seasick, for the winds were "very contrary" and delayed passage in the Irish Sea. On 4 April favorable trade winds bore the Yorkshire at a faster rate southward. All was not harmonious with the passengers, for those who were not Mormons opposed the holding of religious services. As the three-master passed the West Indies, between Cuba and Jamaica, the heat was oppressive. Under the date of 2 May Joseph Smith recorded in his history:

"About one p.m., the mate of the ship Yorkshire opened the testament at the 27th chapter of Acts, and asked the passengers how they would fed to be shipwrecked like Paul? Elder Thomas Bullock replied instantly, "It is very likely we shall be shipwrecked; but the hull of this old vessel has got to Carry us safe into New Orleans." The mate was then called away to hoist the fore-top-royal sail.

"Between one and two next morning, when off Cape St. Antonio, Cuba, there was much vivid lightning, when a white squall caught the fore-top-royal sail, which careened the vessel, when the foremast, mainmast, and mizzenmast snapped asunder with an awful crash: The whole of the masts above, with the jib and spanker, and sixteen sails and studding poles, were carried overboard with a tremendous splash and surge, when the vessel righted. Daybreak, found the deck all in confusion and a complete wreck. During the day, hoisted a sail from the stump of the mainmast to the bow of the vessel, thus leaving nothing but the hull of the vessel to carry the Saints into New Orleans."

On 10 May 1843 the Yorkshire arrived at New Orleans. It was a sixty-three-day passage, longer than most voyages to the Louisiana port. Two children died at sea. The Mormons continued their journey up the Mississippi to St. Louis on the steamboat Dove and from St. Louis to Nauvoo, Illinois, aboard the Amaranth.

The Yorkshire, which is easily confused with the more famous American ship of the same name, was owned by Cross & Co., and her home port was Bristol, England. Records also show her tonnage at 808 and at times indicate she was ship-rigged. She had a billethead. After 1856 her fate is unknown.
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Source: The Contributor: representing the Young men's and Young ladies ..., Volume 12 By Junius F. Wells, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, p448

The following is from the history of Joseph Smith under the date May 2nd, 1843:
“About one O’clock, p.m., the mate of the ship Yorkshire opened the Testament at the twenty-seventh chapter of the acts, and asked the passengers how they would like to be shipwrecked like Paul! Elder Thomas bullock replied instantly: ‘It is very likely we shall be shipwrecked; but the hull of this old vessel has got to carry us safe into New Orleans.’ The mate was then called away to hoist the foretop royal sail.”

“Between one and two o’clock next morning, when off Cape St. Antonio Cuba, there was much vivid lightning, when a while squall caught the foretop royal sail, Which careened the vessel, when the foremast, mainmast and mizenmast snapped asunder with an awful crash; the whole of the masts above, with the jib and spanker, and sixteen sails and studding poles, were carried overboard with a tremendous splash and surge, when the vessel righted. At daybreak all on deck was in confusion and a complete wreck. During the day a sail was hoisted from the stump of the main mast to the bow of the vessel, thus leaving nothing but the hull of the vessel to carry the Saints into New Orleans.”

From New Orleans the journey was continued up the Mississippi River, and “on Wednesday, May 31st, 1843, the steamer Amaranth.” writes the Prophet Joseph, “landed in Nauvoo the Saints, who had left Liverpool in the Yorkshire, under the care of Elders Thomas bullock and Richard Rushton, all well; and also some Saints who had left there more recently in another vessel.”

Camilla SMITH - George Ensign SMITH pedigree

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