Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Success and Tragedy - Ancestory of Mary BRONSON

Relationship - GUNN:
11th great-grandfather
Dr. Jasper GUNN Immigrant (1606-1671) wife Mary/Christian -son- Nathaniel GUNN (1637-1663) died at age 24 wife 10th great-grandmother Sarah DAY GUNN KELLOGG (abt 1640-1677) -son- Samuel GUNN (1662-1755) wife Elizabeth WYATT (1665-1735) -daughter- Elizabeth GUNN (1689-1744) husband Simon COOLEY (1687-1747) -son- Lieut. Abner COOLEY (1712-1788) wife Jerusha GRAVES (1717-1801) -daughter- Jerusha COOLEY (1738-1803) husband David BRONSON (1733-1803) -son- Sylvanus BRONSON (1769-1830) wife Esther REMINGTON (1772-1835) -daughter- Mary BRONSON (1806-1888) husband Horace Datus ENSIGN (1797-1846) -son- Martin Luther ENSIGN (1831- 1911) wife Mary DUNN (1833-1920) -daughter- Harriett Camilla ENSIGN (1859-1930) husband Isaac SMITH (1857-1914) -son- George Ensign SMITH (1898-1967) wife Amy Ella HAWKES (1897-1971) -daughter- Camilla SMITH (1926-1999) - Lark - JR.

Success
First Doctor Jasper GUNN Immigrant (1606-1671)

Parent:
(Following the Ark of the Covenant: The Treasure of God, By Kerry Ross Boren, Lisa Lee Boren)
Page 171
Henry GUNN, …a direct descendant of Sir James GUNN (the Westford Knight). Removed from the Highlands of Scotland to Great Burstead in England shortly after the year 1600. A family record states that Henry Gunn’s wife, Sarah, was delivered of a son “ in the Highlands of Scotland” only days before their arrival at Great Burstead. That son, Jasper Gunn, was christened at Great Burstead on 9 August 1606 [LDS Gen. Soc. AFN: 8TH 3-F6.]

Jasper Gunn had little opportunity to know his father. Henry Gunn, who was a renowned sailor, with considerable knowledge of the coastline of America, either from the benefit of personal experience or from maps and charts of his ancestors, or both, had come to England to join the Hudson Expedition. As such, he would have necessarily worked closely with John Dee, who already had copies of the maps of the Sinclair-Zeno Expedition, and backed…
Page 172
Following the death of Henry Gunn in 1610-11, Jasper Gunn became a ward of none other than William Sinclair of Rosslyn, a very significant fact indeed,...
no more of page 172 available

Emigration:
(Families of Early Milford, Connecticut, By Susan Emma Woodruff Abbott, pp.316-317)
Jasper arrived in Boston, Mass. 8 October 1635 in the ship “Defense” that sailed from London 14 July 1535 when he was 29 years old. On the same passenger list was Ann Gunn ae 25, relationship, if any not known…. He settled in Roxbury, Mass. And on 25 May 1636 was made a “freeman” of that place at a General Court held in Boston. [He was allotted land in Roxbury in 1639 and was a member of the church there. The same year he was given land in Milford, Conn. As a free planter.]

Family:
(Families of Early Milford, Connecticut, By Susan Emma Woodruff Abbott, pp.316-317)
Jasper Gunn was born ca 1606 and died 12 January 1670/1 (MVR). He married [Mary] Christian (____) who died probably Octorber of 1690 in Milford.

Children: Samuel, Jobamah, Daniel, Nathaniel, Mehitable.

Founder:
Looking to start his own small colony, Jasper with several other families from Roxbury and Dorchester purchased even more land from the local Indians. Then on November 24, 1640 this area was named the town of Milford. Being considered one of the founders of Milford, Jasper Gunn was also considered to be Milford first physician. (http://www.ctparanormalhistorylegends.com/id12.html)

Religion:
(Families of Early Milford, Connecticut By Susan Emma Woodruff Abbott, pp.316-317)
Jasper and Mary were admitted to the church in Milford 25 april 1641 “having been admitted and dismissed from the church in Hartford”. The town of Milford gave him land on several occasions, 1639, 1646, 1649, 1659, 1660 and possibly at other times.

Physician:
Jasper GUNN first Doctor of Milford, CT. At Hartford Jasper GUNN recorded as being one of only two Doctors in the Colony.

(Thirty-one ‘phisitions’ were on hand for Connecticut’s Medical Beginnings, By Lawrence D. Nizza, reprinted with permission from The Hartford Courant (The Courant Magazine, June 2, 1957))
THE EARLIER physicians were men of several professions. Some were both tailor-surgeon, schoolmaster-doctor. These duties were not far removed from each other. In 1649, Jasper Gunn became a licensed physician. In addition to treating sick and broken bodies, he also repaired broken pots and pans. His accounts included bills for repairing kettles and skillets as well as for attending the sick.

(THE EARLY NEW ENGLAND DOCTOR: AN ADAPTATION TO A PROVINCIAL ENVIRONMENT* MALCOLM SYDNEY BEINFIELD, YALE JOURNAL OF BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE)
Page282
In the account book of Dr. Jasper Gunn of Milford, there were several copies of the actual bills rendered. It is interesting to note that Dr. Gunn made little distinction on his bills between medical services and the sale or repair of metalware, also that he charged more for the actual medicine administered than for his time and trouble. His account book reads:'
February 11, 1656
Due to me from Isake Ganis
Due before for his children ............. 7-6
for things for his young child.......... 5-0
for seven doses of pills .................... 7-0
for 4 journeys ................................... 2-0

March 4, 1656
Due to me from William Ayres s d
for 36 oz. of Sirups for John…..... 12-0
for 5 visits ........................................05-0
for 1 oz. oyntment.......................... 01-0
for two new ecillets ...........…........ 07-0
1 Bills are inscribed on the front leaves of an almanac formerly belonging to Jasper Gunn and now located in the library of Trinity College, Hartford. Published in G. Russell: Early Medicine and Medical Men in Connecticut, p. 13.

Other Occupations:
Milford:
(Families of Early Milford, Connecticut, By Susan Emma Woodruff Abbott, pp.316-317)
Gunn was Milford’s first physician, a mender of brass and copper vessels…, schoolmaster, sealer of weights and measures, a deacon of the church and generally a man of importance in the community.

Hartford:
(Families of Early Milford, Connecticut, By Susan Emma Woodruff Abbott,
pp.316-317)
In 1647, he removed to Hartford, Hartford Co, CT, where he continued his medical and other practices, also operating a mill, being exempted from "watching and warding" while so employed. He remained there until about 1659, and kept an account book during the 1650s, in which he also wrote medical notes, mostly in shorthand. The original can be found in the Watkinson Library at Trinity College in Hartford. In May 1661 he appeared in court in New Haven as attorney for Mrs. Joanna Prudden of Milford in a case involving the ownership of a horse. The horse was awarded to the plantiff John Davinport. The General Court licensed him 21 May 1657 to practice "physisicke."

(History of the colony of New Haven: before and after the union with …)
Page 94
General Court Nov. 24th, 1640
…At this meeting “it was also voted, so that justice be done between man and man, (because false weighs and false measures are an abomination in the sight of the Lord,) that all measures for commerce, for buying and selling, should be made equal to the standard used at New Haven, which was brought from the Bay, and to be sealed by Jasper Gunn: and that whosever should buy or sell by a measure not legally sealed, should forfeit for every such default. 5s.”
Page 112
The subject of education received early attention from the first settlers of the town. Good schools were considered of the highest importance to the community of anything next the church. The first school was kept by Jasper Gunn, the physician.
Page 136
Others of the first settlers were liberally educated. Of these were William Fowler,…Jasper Gunn,…Robert Treat. [Treat was our uncle, he became a Colonial Governor of CT.]



Tragedy
Sarah DAY GUNN KELLOGG (abt 1640-1677) Killed by Indians
During the Last Attack on Hatfield, MA on 19 Sep 1677

Sarah DAY GUNN KELLOGG (abt 1640-1677) was the daughter of Robert DAY Immigrant (abt 1604-1648) founder of Hartford, CT and his second wife Editha Stebbins (1613-1688). Sarah married Nathaniel GUNN 7 Nov 1658, Nathaniel was the oldest child of Dr. Jasper GUNN and Christian.

"There is a record of the births of their
[Nathaniel GUNN and Sarah DAY] first two sons , but they are not heard of again. Nathaniel Gunn was about 23 years old when he died, and his young wife was left with a son, Samuel [GUNN], born shortly before or shortly after his [father's] death. At the time, [Sarah's] mother [Editha] lived in Springfield, MA with her third husband [Rev. Elizier HOLYOKE], and Sarah Day Gunn joined her there.... On 24 NOV 1664, Sarah married Samuel Kellogg. They lived in Hatfield, MA."

(From "A History of Hatfield Massachusetts" by Daniel White Wells)
"Through Middle Lane poured a band of armed and painted warriors who fell upon houses lying outside the stockade. The torch was applied to the buildings of Samuel Kellogg at the corner of the lane, and his wife Sarah and her infant son [Joseph] were killed, and another child, Samuel [Kellogg], a boy of three years was seized and bound."

"It appears Samuel Kellogg, the kidnapped 3 year old half-brother to Samuel Gunn, was rescued in May 1678 by Benjamin Waite, et al."

(http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dfgraves/Trees/Graves/TGraves.htm)
At about 11 o'clock on the morning of 19 Sep 1677, while most of the men were at work in the meadows cutting corn, Hatfield was attacked by indians. They came through Middle Lane and fell upon houses lying outside the stockade. They torched the buildings of Samuel Kellogg at the corner of the lane and his wife, Sarah, and her infant son were killed and another child, Samuel, 3 yrs., was seized and bound. Surprised by the suddenness of the attack, Obadiah Dickinson and one child were captured unresisting at the house below. His wife was wounded and left for dead and the house set on fire. John Allis's barn was burned and his six-year-old daughter, Abigail, captured. With no attempt to enter the open gate of the stockade the invaders rushed across the street to the houses on the east side, whose occupants were seeking places of safety. The indians sped northward and killed the wife of Selectman Samuel Belden, who lived on the Silas Porter place. John Coleman's house was burned and his wife, Hannah, and infant child, Bethiah, were slain, one child wounded and two were captured, of whom little Sarah was only 4. John Wells' daughter, Elizabeth, age 2, was killed, his wife, Sarah, and one child wounded. Hannah Jennings, wife of Stephen Jennings, was made prisoner with her two children by her former husband, Samuel Gillett, who was killed at an earlier fight. Philip Russell's wife, Elizabeth and their 3-year-old son, Stephen, were killed. Across the street, on the J.D. Brown place, stood the home of Samuel Foote, who had moved from his first allotment. His wife, Mary, with a young son, Nathaniel, and a 3-year-old daughter, Mary, were seized and dragged along. On the next lot above men were at work building a house for John Graves, Jr., who was soon to marry Sarah White. Hastening northward to finish their work of destruction, with an attack on the family of their hated foe, Benjamin Waite, they shot from the frame of the structure being erected the brothers, John and Isaac Graves, and 2 young carpenters from Springfield, John Atchisson and John Cooper. Waite's house was at the very end of the village street. The indians burned his house and barn and took away his whole family,--wife, Martha, and three children, Mary, Martha, and Sarah, aged 6, 4 and 2. Abigail, 8-year-old daughter of Wiliam Bartholomew, a former resident of Deerfield, was also captured.

[Also our 10th great grandfather Lt./Sgt. Isaac GRAVES a carpenter along with his brother John Graves the second husband of our 10th great grandmother Mary BRONSON WYATT were both killed in this Indian attack on the Hatfield settlement while building a house for John's son John, outside the walls of the stockade built to protect the town of Hatfield.]

(Redemptions of the Hatfield Captives - 1677-78)
On September 16, 1677, attacking Amerindians left Hatfield in chaos! Seventeen hostages were taken, 7 houses and barns burned, 12 villagers killed, and 4 wounded….

One man, Benjamin Waite, a scout who knew how to survive in the woods, knew what he was going to do. After all, his wife and 3 young daughters were among the hostages. The first move was to get to Albany as quickly as possible to find out if the Mohawks were involved. By October 4, Waite was back in Springfield reporting that the New York tribe was not involved. He immediately left for Boston before Benoni Stebbins, who had escaped from the Amerindians, arrived in Hadley with his news about the captives. Finally, after bureaucratic delays in Boston, Waite managed to obtain an appointment as agent to secure the release of the captives and funds were set aside to meet the ransom demands. A parley with the Amerindians in mid-October failed. The only recourse left for the English was to track the hostages to Canada, through territory never traversed by the English colonists.

By October 24, over a month after the raid, Waite and Stephen Jennings (whose wife and her two children were also captives) began the monumental task of finding the hostages. After petty bureaucratic delays in Albany, Waite and Jennings were finally given permission to go after the captives on December 10. Now the rescuers were faced not only with traveling through unknown territory but with deep winter snows. A local warrior guided them to Lake George, helped them fashion a canoe, and drew them a rough map of Lake George and Lake Champlain -- and then departed.

December 16, 1677 - Lake Champlain was reached, the first time English colonists had set foot there. Strong winds and ice slowed their progress, their provision ran out and they were forced to live off the land. But nothing could stop these two men for long. On or about January 6, the trackers reached the frontier of Canada, nearly 4 months after the raid on Hatfield. In a nearby town Hannah Jennings and a few other captives were found. The other hostages were close by with their captors. Immediately Waite and Jennings started for Quebec to bargain with Governor Frontenac for the release of the hostages. With the governor's help, the payment of two hundred pounds secured the release of the English. Of the 21 captives, 17 were returned; 2 children had been killed during the long trek north, probably because they fell ill. Sergeant Plympton of Deerfied was burned at the stake in Canada. Two children were born in Canada. Martha Waite had a daughter on January 22 who was named Canada. Nearly two months later, Hannah Jennings had a daughter who was named Captivity.

The English remained in Canada until the winter weather was over. At long last, on May 2, 1678, the entire party began the long, slow trip back home.

Relationship-GRAVES:
Thomas GRAVES Immigrant (1585-1662) wife Sarah WHITING (1581/1606-1666) -son- Lt./Sgt. Isaac GRAVES 1629 child immigrant (1620-1677) wife Mary CHURCH (1636-1695) -son- John GRAVES (1664-1746) wife Sarah BANKS (1668-1709/64) -son- Isaac GRAVES (1688-1781) wife Mary PARSONS (1688-1769) -daughter- Jerusha GRAVES (1717-1801) husband Lieut. Abner COOLEY (1712-1788) -daughter- Jerusha COOLEY (1738-1803) husband David BRONSON (1733-1803) -son- Sylvanus BRONSON (1769-1830) wife Esther REMINGTON (1772-1835) -daughter- Mary BRONSON (1806-1888) husband Horace Datus ENSIGN (1797-1846) -son- Martin Luther ENSIGN (1831- 1911) wife Mary DUNN (1833-1920) -daughter- Harriett Camilla ENSIGN (1859-1930) husband Isaac SMITH (1857-1914) -son- George Ensign SMITH (1898-1967) wife Amy Ella HAWKES (1897-1971) -daughter- Camilla SMITH (1926-1999) - Lark - JR.

Relationship 1 of 2
BRONSON:
12 GGF and 11 GGF Roger BRONSON (1576-1637) [Related twice through two children - John and Richard] wife Mary UNDERWOOD (1585-1622) -son- 11 GGF John BRONSON Immigrant (1602-1680) [In 1635, John accompanied his brother Richard and sister Mary aboard the ship Defense, landing in Boston, Massachusetts, on 8 October 1635.] wife Frances HILLS (-1680) -daughter- Mary BRONSON (1624-aft 1681) husband 1.John WYATT, (2.John GRAVES, 3.Lt. William ALLICE, 4.Samuel GAYLORD) -daughter- Elizabeth WYATT (1665-1737) husband Samuel GUNN (1662-1755) -daughter- Elizabeth GUNN (1689-1744) husband Simon COOLEY (1687-1747) -son- Lieut. Abner COOLEY (1712-1788) wife Jerusha GRAVES (1717-1801) -daughter- Jerusha COOLEY (1738-1803) husband David BRONSON (1733-1803) -son- Sylvanus BRONSON (1769-1830) wife Esther REMINGTON (1772-1835) -daughter- Mary BRONSON (1806-1888) husband Horace Datus ENSIGN (1797-1846) -son- Martin Luther ENSIGN (1831- 1911) wife Mary DUNN (1833-1920) -daughter- Harriett Camilla ENSIGN (1859-1930) husband Isaac SMITH (1857-1914) -son- George Ensign SMITH (1898-1967) wife Amy Ella HAWKES (1897-1971) -daughter- Camilla SMITH (1926-1999) - Lark - JR.

Relationship 2 of 2 BRONSON - this line is not involved in this story:
12 GGF and 11 GGF Roger BRONSON (1576-1637) [Related twice through two children - John and Richard] wife Mary UNDERWOOD (1585-1622) -son- 10 GGF Richard BRONSON Immigrant (1615-1687) [In 1635, Richard accompanied his brother John and sister Mary aboard the ship Defense, landing in Boston, Massachusetts, on 8 October 1635.] wife Abigail WILBOUR -son- John BRONSON (1645-) wife Hannah SCOTT (1651-1725) -son- Isaac BRONSON (1672-) divorced wife Thankful DIBBLE (1585-1622) -son- Joseph BRONSON (1708-) wife Mary TALYLOR (1708-) -son- David BRONSON (1733-1803) wife Jerusha COOLEY (1738-1803) -son- Sylvanus BRONSON (1769-1830) wife Esther REMINGTON (1772-1835) -daughter- Mary BRONSON (1806-1888) husband Horace Datus ENSIGN (1797-1846) -son- Martin Luther ENSIGN (1831- 1911) wife Mary DUNN (1833-1920) -daughter- Harriett Camilla ENSIGN (1859-1930) husband Isaac SMITH (1857-1914) -son- George Ensign SMITH (1898-1967) wife Amy Ella HAWKES (1897-1971) -daughter- Camilla SMITH (1926-1999) - Lark - JR.


1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Thanks very much for posting this! I only discovered it today (06/15/12).

I am a 10th great-grandson of Dr. Jasper Gunn.

Thanks,
Grant Sullivan
grant_sull@yahoo.com